Publication: Shakespeare Water Color Illustrations

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Blake’s water color illustrations to...

"I again display my Giant forms to the Public": Q&A with Tate Britain

The Tate Blake exhibition closed its doors in February and the many works on display are presumably now all...

Publication: TO THE PUBLIC [Prospectus 1793]

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of To the Public, dated “October...

Blake Quarterly (winter 2019-20)

Clicking the button that says “Publish” never gets old, and today I did that for our winter 2019-20 issue...

All Fun and Games

At the beginning of summer, my mom, who’s a sixth-grade English teacher, asked me to take her classes for...
Publications
Publication: Shakespeare Water Color Illustrations
Blake Quarterly
"I again display my Giant forms to the Public": Q&A with Tate Britain
Publications
Publication: TO THE PUBLIC [Prospectus 1793]
Blake Quarterly
Blake Quarterly (winter 2019-20)
BAND
All Fun and Games
BAND, Digital Humanities, XML

Songs of Innocent XML

The top of the XML tree for William Blake, An Island in the Moon, Copy 1 (1784–85), page 1, www.blakearchive.org/bad/bb74.1.xml.

One of my responsibilities as an Andrew W. Mellon Digital Humanities Fellow at the University of Rochester is contributing to an established digital humanities project. For that reason, I am the newest member of the Blake Archive North Division team. While I do not have a background in William Blake’s works or those of his contemporaries, I study U.S. religious and cultural history, so Blake’s talk of a unity in religion and his flirtation with Swedenborg’s tiered heaven echo what I’ve read in American sources. Blake’s visions are wild and, unlike many religious innovators, he actually drew and painted them.

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BAND

Color-to-Character Relationships in America a Prophecy

In a departure from my previous investigation into Blake’s use of color, which focused on brightness and change over time, I have here considered the possible relationships between the mythological characters and the overall palette of a copy. For this project, I’ve focused on copies A, M, and O of America a Prophecy, looking at the depictions of the characters Urizen, Orc, and Albion.

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Blake Quarterly

Guest Post/Poet: S. Yarberry Interviews Kiki Petrosino

This post is the third in a series of interviews by S. Yarberry—the others were with Aditi Machado and S. Brook Corfman. S. approached us with the idea of interviewing poets about Blake and his infuence on their work: “I’m interested in bridging contemporary poetry with the academic study of Blake—academia and creative circles sometimes sit so far apart that we forget how much common language we have. The interview has been lightly edited for style. Bios. are at the end of the post.

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Publications

Publication: FOR THE SEXES Copies B, F, K

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of For the Sexes: The Gates of Paradise Copies B, F, and K. They join Copy D of For Children: The Gates of Paradise and Copy D of For the Sexes: The Gates of Paradise—the revised and augmented version of For Children—already available in the Archive. The Archive is also publishing color printed impressions of Plates 1 and 7 of Visions of the Daughters of Albion.

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BAND

Why the Magnifying Glass is Awesome!

While we were working our way through proofing the new batch of Blake’s letters a few months back, I had a better chance that I had ever had before to learn just how useful the magnifying glass can be.

The testing site is pretty much identical to the public site, so like the public site it has the magnifying glass which made it possible to take a magnified look at objects during proofing. This came in handy when trying to make important calls about questionable letters.

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BATS

Exploring Blake’s Satanic Serpents

Back in January as everyone slowly made their way back to campus here at UNC, Blake Archive editor Joe Viscomi and I had a chat in one of the Archive offices. After talking about our winter break and our plans for the spring semester, the conversation of course turned to Blake. A framed Blake Trust facsimile reproduction of one of Blake’s illustrations to Dante’s Divine Comedy hanging on the wall caught our attention. The image shows a dragon or serpent attacking the thief Agnolo Brunelleschi. 

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Blake Quarterly

Blogging about BARS

The British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) held its biennial conference (Romantic Facts and Fantasies) at the University of Nottingham in late July (@BARS2019). The International Conference on Romanticism (@ICRMCR2019) at the University of Manchester and the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism meeting (@2019Nassr) at the University of Illinois at Chicago followed in quick succession.

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BAND

Evaluating Color in Heaven and Hell

Majoring in both English Literature and Computational Linguistics and enrolling in Linear Algebra for my personal pleasure, my undergraduate career is best described as idiosyncratic. Creating a project through the Blake Archive presented me with an abundance of options at the intersection of my two major fields but I decided to experiment with a realm I am less than familiar with: color theory.

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