Blake Quarterly (autumn 2020)

Today sees the publication of our latest issue, fall 2020 (vol. 54, no. 2), which will be open access...

Q&A with Mike Goode

Our home at the University of Rochester is about ninety miles from Syracuse University, where Mike Goode is a...

Opening a Can of (Invisible) Worms: Blake’s Use of Metaphor in “The Sick Rose”

This guest post is by Natasha Bharucha, a recent graduate who contacted us to ask if she could participate...

Publication: EUROPE Copies C & F

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of Europe a Prophecy Copies C and F,...

Tutorial Video: Image Use and Permission

We’ve just published a video about when you need to ask for permission when using images from the Blake...
Blake Quarterly, Publications
Blake Quarterly (autumn 2020)
Q&A
Q&A with Mike Goode
Guest Post
Opening a Can of (Invisible) Worms: Blake’s Use of Metaphor in “The Sick Rose”
Publications
Publication: EUROPE Copies C & F
Tutorial Videos
Tutorial Video: Image Use and Permission
Publications

Publication: TO THE PUBLIC [Prospectus 1793]

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of To the Public, dated “October 10, 1793.” It first came to light in Gilchrist’s Life of Blake, 1863, where it was introduced with a brief heading that described “a characteristic Prospectus issued by Blake.” It had been transcribed from an “original…in engraved writing printed in blue on a single leaf about 11 x 7 ½ inches…obtained only at the last moment” from a “Mr. Frost”-perhaps William Edward Frost, a painter, member of the Royal Academy, and sometime collector of engravings by Blake’s friend Thomas Stothard (Bentley, Blake Books Supplement, page 142). Like several of Blake’s letters, then, his 1793 prospectus is known only from the transcription of unknowable accuracy from Gilchrist’s biography.

Continue reading
BAND

All Fun and Games

At the beginning of summer, my mom, who’s a sixth-grade English teacher, asked me to take her classes for a day. Working with young kids is a little out of the ordinary for a grad student, but it seemed like a good way to get my feet wet with teaching composition on the horizon. Plus, getting a glimpse of the potential obstacles, needs, and interests of an eleven-year-old learner was bound to offer me a valuable perspective that I may not otherwise get.

Continue reading