The Mystery and Magic of Photo Processing

My goal is to show off the difference a little contrast and color-adjusting can do when trying to read...

Blake Quarterly (spring 2022)

Our spring issue (vol. 55, no. 4) came out this week.

Blake Quarterly (winter 2021-22)

The winter issue of the journal (vol. 55, no. 3) is now online.

A Blakean Jack-O'-Lantern

Can there be a more Blakean Halloween image than "The Ghost of a Flea"? How fantastic would that look...

Blake Quarterly (fall 2021)

Our autumn 2021 issue (vol. 55, no. 2) is out now; it will be open access for a week.
BAND, Digital Humanities, Uncategorized
The Mystery and Magic of Photo Processing
Blake Quarterly, Publications
Blake Quarterly (spring 2022)
Blake Quarterly, Publications
Blake Quarterly (winter 2021-22)
BAND, Holiday
A Blakean Jack-O'-Lantern
Blake Quarterly, Publications
Blake Quarterly (fall 2021)
Digital Humanities, Guest Post, Uncategorized

Slaying the Demon King: William Blake and Urizen in Devil May Cry 5

Julian S. Whitney
Wabash College

Video games have become a popular medium in which to feature excerpts from Romantic poetry. The 2019 post-apocalyptic action game developed by Hideo Kojima, Death Stranding, originated with a 2016 reveal trailer that showcased a short excerpt from William Blake’s “Auguries of Innocence.”[1] Likewise, the 2014 side-scrolling exploration game titled Elegy for a Dead World requires its players to write a diary based on their exploration through three worlds inspired by the literature of Percy Shelley, Lord Byron, and John Keats.[2] These video games incorporate Romantic poetry as a way to contextualize, thematize, and construct the narrative and mechanical aspects of their respective designs. But what happens when a video game appropriates certain mythological elements of Romanticism and integrates them into the foundation of its own story?

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Guest Post

Melanie Smith and the Influence of Blake

Melanie Smith is one of the leading artists of her generation. Her recent piece Vortex is a multimedia work inspired by William Blake’s The Circle of the Lustful that intertwines performance, sculpture, and moving images. Smith’s installation at the Parafin in London, titled Leave it to the Amateurs, pulls from Vortex, consisting of film, photographs, and collages. These are displayed alongside paintings on panel that are derived from the works of Blake.

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Blake Quarterly

A New Blake Book

I’d like to think that the Blake Quarterly does a decent job of celebrating books and articles on Blake that are not in English. Chuck Ripley’s annual checklist of publications, which will next appear in our upcoming summer 2021 issue, features four collaborators: Hüseyin Alhas for works in Turkish, Fernando Castanedo for Romance languages, Hikari Sato for Japanese, and Vera Serdechnaia for Russian and other Cyrillic languages.

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BAND, Digital Humanities

Ginsberg’s Memories of Blake’s Sunflower

Recently, while looking for inspiration for a poetry assignment, I revisited one of my favorite poems, Allen Ginsberg’s “Sunflower Sutra.” I always loved this poem for its energy and relentless optimism. After arriving at a dock and sitting “under the huge shade of a Southern/Pacific locomotive to look at the sunset over the/box house hills and cry,” Ginsberg sees a dead sunflower and goes into a fit of emotions, ending with the cheery declaration, “we’re all beautiful golden sunflowers inside.” But this journey is not easy. Before Ginsberg’s uplifting conclusion, we’re first taken through a sort of microcosm of the industrial wasteland that is America:

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BAND, Digital Humanities

The Emendations in Poetical Sketches

Blake’s earliest work, Poetical Sketches, is printed in a typographically traditional way, which made reproducing a digital edition of Sketches a little anomalous. Noting and describing Blake’s handwritten emendations and other printing errors initiated questions that went beyond typical Archive standards.

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