All Fun and Games

At the beginning of summer, my mom, who’s a sixth-grade English teacher, asked me to take her classes for...

Publication: 19 Separate Plates

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of nineteen separate prints designed and etched or engraved...

Blake and Bloom, a Memorial Note

This memorial note is by Kenneth Gross, who teaches English at the University of Rochester. His books include Spenserian...

Blake’s Afterlife: Howard Finster, the Backwoods Blake

About one-hundred miles north of Atlanta, a colorful, otherworldly folk art environment stands in Summerville, Georgia. Self-taught artist Howard...

Insights from a Doubly Digital Humanist

This semester I enrolled in a course entitled “Digital History: Historical Worlds, Virtual Worlds, Virtual Museums”— thoroughly intrigued by...
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All Fun and Games
Publications
Publication: 19 Separate Plates
Blake Quarterly
Blake and Bloom, a Memorial Note
BAND
Blake’s Afterlife: Howard Finster, the Backwoods Blake
BAND, Digital Humanities
Insights from a Doubly Digital Humanist
BAND

Why the Magnifying Glass is Awesome!

While we were working our way through proofing the new batch of Blake’s letters a few months back, I had a better chance that I had ever had before to learn just how useful the magnifying glass can be.

The testing site is pretty much identical to the public site, so like the public site it has the magnifying glass which made it possible to take a magnified look at objects during proofing. This came in handy when trying to make important calls about questionable letters.

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BATS

Exploring Blake’s Satanic Serpents

Back in January as everyone slowly made their way back to campus here at UNC, Blake Archive editor Joe Viscomi and I had a chat in one of the Archive offices. After talking about our winter break and our plans for the spring semester, the conversation of course turned to Blake. A framed Blake Trust facsimile reproduction of one of Blake’s illustrations to Dante’s Divine Comedy hanging on the wall caught our attention. The image shows a dragon or serpent attacking the thief Agnolo Brunelleschi. 

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Blake Quarterly

Blogging about BARS

The British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) held its biennial conference (Romantic Facts and Fantasies) at the University of Nottingham in late July (@BARS2019). The International Conference on Romanticism (@ICRMCR2019) at the University of Manchester and the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism meeting (@2019Nassr) at the University of Illinois at Chicago followed in quick succession.

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BAND

Evaluating Color in Heaven and Hell

Majoring in both English Literature and Computational Linguistics and enrolling in Linear Algebra for my personal pleasure, my undergraduate career is best described as idiosyncratic. Creating a project through the Blake Archive presented me with an abundance of options at the intersection of my two major fields but I decided to experiment with a realm I am less than familiar with: color theory.

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BAND

Songs of Instruments and Entrancement: BAND’s Summer Hits

With a hearty batch of letters now up on the site and just a few remaining weeks of summer stretching before us, BAND has eased into a temporary state of repose. Our office is a little quieter, our meetings are a little shorter, and our work schedules— briefly unhindered by semester stressors and publication deadlines— allow for longer gazes outside the office window and, if we’re emboldened by our beloved office neighbor’s closed door, music.

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Publications, Uncategorized

Publication: Letters 1791-1827

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of our third installment of Blake’s 95 known letters. The latest 28, drawn from nine collections, span nearly the entire chronological range of Blake’s correspondence from 1791 to 1827, the year of his death. Three of this group are by Blake’s correspondents—included here because of especially tight connections with their associated documents. (Those pairs are 18 October [Reveley] and October 1791 [Blake]; 23 September [Blake] & September 1800 [Butts]; 18 December [Cumberland] and 19 December 1808 [Blake].)

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Q&A

Q&A with Ramazan Saral

A few months ago the Blake Quarterly got its first subscriber from Turkey (at least in my memory). Ramazan Saral is pursuing a doctoral degree in the Department of English Language and Literature at Ege University in İzmir. His review of Vahiy Kitapları [Prophetic Works], trans. Kaan H. Ökten, will appear in our summer 2019 issue. He kindly agreed to answer a few questions about his love of Blake.

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