Publication: JERUSALEM Copies A and I

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of Jerusalem The Emanation of The Giant...

That Every Child May Joy to Hear: A Musical Adaptation of "A Poison Tree"

The Blake Quarterly has published checklists and reviews of musical settings of Blake’s works in almost every genre. Today...

The Artist, the Poet, and the Proofreader

The relationship between vivid, poetic language and visual art has always intrigued me. As an undergrad, I majored in...

Publication: Pencil Sketches 1779-1790

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of forty-three pencil drawings produced by Blake...

"I heard a Devil curse": Blake and Halloween

It’s about time for Halloween for the Northern Division of the Blake Archive, and as the numerous Victorian houses...
Publications
Publication: JERUSALEM Copies A and I
Blake Quarterly
That Every Child May Joy to Hear: A Musical Adaptation of "A Poison Tree"
BAND
The Artist, the Poet, and the Proofreader
Publications
Publication: Pencil Sketches 1779-1790
BAND, Digital Humanities, Holiday
"I heard a Devil curse": Blake and Halloween
BAND, Tutorial Videos

Tutorial Video: Introduction to Search

Did you know that the search function of the William Blake Archive is one of the most helpful features of the site, allowing you to search both text and image content?

With our search function, you can plug in search terms that lead you not only to poetry and prose, but to images that illustrate the ideas or content that interest you.

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BAND

Reimagining William Blake in the Great War

2018 marks the 100 year anniversary of the ending of WWI, (that is if you do not factor in the Treaty of Versailles in 1919) and just so happens to coincide with a graduate seminar I am currently enrolled in called  “The Great War and Modern Memory.” This class has curiously overlapped in subtle ways with my time spent pondering Blake in the Archive. Blake, of course, did not fight in WWI, but in a strange mixture of past and present, similar to this blog post, he inspired many of the WWI poets and even artists who lived through the Great War and who drew upon his poetry and art in inspiring their own.  

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BAND

Teaching with the Archive

One of the more significant items on my busy schedule this semester is teaching Introduction to Digital Media Studies here at UR. It’s a class I very much enjoy teaching, and one for which I also very much enjoyed designing the syllabus.

Intended as a survey of all things DMS, the class cruises through a wide variety of ideas, tech, people, and histories. Given my close association with the Blake Archive for the last 4.5 years (really?!), I couldn’t help but sneak some BA in there. 

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BAND, XML

A New Guide to Choice Tags

Last time I blogged about the <choice> Tag Project, I established a semi-comprehensive list of situations that required <choice> tags, and ended with a series of unsettled questions. Since then I have investigated the issue more thoroughly and now, having answered those questions, I can put together a more definitive guide. 

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BAND

Reconciling the Four Zoas and Marginalia Encoding Schemas

A while back (actually it’s been more than a year) I wrote about our efforts to develop a set of shared terms to be used across the Four Zoas and Marginalia projects. We’ve been struggling with this since, with the use of <layer> in the marginalia encoding as an interim solution. Since the Four Zoas project has unusual (ahem) layout and intensive revisions, we introduced <zone> to represent the spatial structure of the text and <stage> as a child element of line in an attempt to represent every act of editing in detail. For the marginalia however, we needed a tag to distinguish between Blake’s writing and the typographic text more than anything to denote layers of revision and editing within the line. In order to avoid confusion, we decided to use <layer> for our schema. The results looked like this:

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Publications

Publication: VISIONS Copy R; Misc. Plates & Impressions

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Blake’s Visions of the Daughters of Albion Copy R from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Munich; colored impressions of Visions Plates 1, 2, and 3 (Copy mpi) from the Morgan Library and Museum; a proof of Visions Plate 6 from the Fitzwilliam Museum that belongs to our previously published Visions Copy a; and five monochrome wash drawings for the wood engravings in Thornton’s Virgil added to the seven previously published designs.

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Blake Quarterly

Blake in Sussex

Knowing how hard it is for me to put together a blog post with a couple of illustrations, I can’t imagine what it would be like to make a film. That’s why I spoke to Matt Wilmshurst, a London- and Sussex-based filmmaker and visual effects artist. He’s the writer and director of Blake in Sussex, currently in production, which promises to tell the tale of the Blakes’ turbulent three years outside London.

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BAND, Blake Quarterly

Serendipity and difficulty

Behind the scenes the indefatigable members of the Blake Archive are preparing a batch of separate plates for future publication. In general, I would define separate plates as plates not published as illustrations in books, such as “Chaucers Canterbury Pilgrims” and “Albion Rose.” Each plate may have several states, or stages of execution—”Albion Rose” has two, so we’ll publish an impression of each. Each state may exist in several impressions (prints made from that state).

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BATS

Over-reading Overwriting? A Textual Anomaly in Songs of Innocence, Copy Q

Last year, I traded my work with archived issues of Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly for new tasks in text and image markup of Blake’s illuminated books. Last month, I began writing markup “without a net,” as we say. With Katherine Calvin’s guidance, I am learning to describe individual watercolor drawings without recourse to a previous editor’s text. So, rather than thinking comparatively, I consider only the image at hand, and I have to familiarize myself more thoroughly with the body of search terms The Blake Archive uses to describe and tag images.

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