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Blake Quarterly

Blake Quarterly

Review: Allen Ginsberg, The Complete Songs of Innocence and Experience

This review will appear in the autumn 2018 issue of Blake. The reviewer, Luke Walker, completed his PhD on “William Blake in the 1960s: Counterculture and Radical Reception” at the University of Sussex, and has published various articles and book chapters relating to this topic. His most recent publication is “Beat Britain: Poetic Vision and Division in Albion’s ‘Underground’” in The Routledge Handbook of International Beat Literature (2018). His next major Blake project will be a study of Blake’s influence on modern children’s literature.

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Blake Quarterly

Blake in Sussex

Knowing how hard it is for me to put together a blog post with a couple of illustrations, I can’t imagine what it would be like to make a film. That’s why I spoke to Matt Wilmshurst, a London- and Sussex-based filmmaker and visual effects artist. He’s the writer and director of Blake in Sussex, currently in production, which promises to tell the tale of the Blakes’ turbulent three years outside London.

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BAND, Blake Quarterly

Serendipity and difficulty

Behind the scenes the indefatigable members of the Blake Archive are preparing a batch of separate plates for future publication. In general, I would define separate plates as plates not published as illustrations in books, such as “Chaucers Canterbury Pilgrims” and “Albion Rose.” Each plate may have several states, or stages of execution—”Albion Rose” has two, so we’ll publish an impression of each. Each state may exist in several impressions (prints made from that state).

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Blake Quarterly

“Rosenbach and Blake” (and Bentley)

This week we published our winter issue (vol. 51, no. 3), which will be completely open access for the next few days. It features the last article in our queue from the late Jerry Bentley, “Rosenbach and Blake,” about the numerous Blake works handled by the dealer A. S. W. Rosenbach in the first half of the twentieth century, many from the collection of W. A. White and many for the collection of Lessing J. Rosenwald (now in the Library of Congress and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC).

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