Category

Blake Quarterly

Blake Quarterly

Paul Miner

Recently we discovered that Paul Miner, an independent Blake scholar whose work is well known to many of the readers of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly, passed away earlier this year. Morton Paley noticed that items from Paul’s collection were being offered by a bookseller online, describing him as “late,” and some phone calls confirmed the sad news.

Continue reading
Blake Quarterly

Guest post: Portrait of a poet with a book

Today we have a guest post from Jonathan Morse of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. Jon sent us a message asking if we had a use for an image he’d found in the collections of the Library of Congress; his post is the result of that correspondence.

Between January and May 1920, William Butler Yeats toured the United States and Canada under the management of the J. B. Pond Lycaeum Lecture Bureau, addressing audiences on such topics as “The Irish Movement and the Irish Theatre” and “The Younger Generation.” By “the younger generation” he meant contemporary poets. So far as I have been able to learn from the newspaper coverage online at newspapers.com, in the Library of Congress, and in the archives of the student newspapers that covered his appearances at Oberlin and Yale, he never mentioned Blake.

Continue reading
Blake Quarterly

A Last Hurrah

Our last hurrahs are like singers’ farewell tours—they tend to come around again next year—but this is a farewell to our fiftieth volume, which officially ends on 30 June, even though we have already published all four issues.

Continue reading
Blake Quarterly

The Fortunate “Un-“fortunate in BIQ Wordlists

While still working through the S-Z wordlist of potential misspellings in Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly, I have found myself amidst a list of “Un-” vocabulary. Almost exactly a year ago, I reflected on the isolation of “self” and its implications as I remediated words that required a hyphen, separating “self” from terms like “alienation,” “complicating,” “defeating,” and “deluding” by adding a hyphen that the OCR had mistakenly removed. And now that I’ve reached the end of my list, I reflect again on what this work teaches me about William Blake scholarship, and about language more generally.

Continue reading