Vetusta Monumenta Digital Edition Launching Soon

from Noah Heringman On June 24, the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture (USC) together with the Society of Antiquaries...

Q&A with Ramazan Saral

A few months ago the Blake Quarterly got its first subscriber from Turkey (at least in my memory). Ramazan...

Guest Post/Poet: S. Yarberry Interviews S. Brook Corfman

This post is the second in a series of interviews by S. Yarberry—the first was with Aditi Machado. S....

Publication: New Exhibitions Added

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the republication of our Blake Biography and essay on Illuminated Printing as digital exhibitions, an...

A Watermark Mystery

Sometimes in archival work, you find yourself on these “side quests,” tracking down a paradoxically indispensable yet trivial bit...
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Vetusta Monumenta Digital Edition Launching Soon
Q&A
Q&A with Ramazan Saral
Q&A
Guest Post/Poet: S. Yarberry Interviews S. Brook Corfman
Publications
Publication: New Exhibitions Added
BAND, Digital Humanities
A Watermark Mystery
Q&A

Q&A with Ramazan Saral

A few months ago the Blake Quarterly got its first subscriber from Turkey (at least in my memory). Ramazan Saral is pursuing a doctoral degree in the Department of English Language and Literature at Ege University in İzmir. His review of Vahiy Kitapları [Prophetic Works], trans. Kaan H. Ökten, will appear in our summer 2019 issue. He kindly agreed to answer a few questions about his love of Blake.

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Q&A

Guest Post/Poet: S. Yarberry Interviews S. Brook Corfman

This post is the second in a series of interviews by S. Yarberry—the first was with Aditi Machado. S. approached us with the idea of interviewing poets about Blake and his infuence on their work: “I’m interested in bridging contemporary poetry with the academic study of Blake—academia and creative circles sometimes sit so far apart that we forget how much common language we have.” The interview has been lightly edited for style. Bios. are at the end of the post.

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BAND

How to say that a work lacks binding

At the William Blake Archive, we rely heavily on precedent when making important editorial decisions. In other words, when unsure what to do about a certain metadata field or how to deal with something unusual in the textual transcription for a given work, we check to see what we did in similar situations in previously published works.

For example, when working on Blake’s letters, I needed a review on how to handle the textual transcription for lines with lots of cross-outs and overwrites.

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Publications

Publication: New Exhibitions Added

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the republication of our Blake Biography and essay on Illuminated Printing as digital exhibitions, an ideal form for such extensively illustrated works. They join our recently published first installment in this new wing, the multi-gallery presentation of Blake’s painting and engraving of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury pilgrims. They can be accessed through our About Blake section or Archive Exhibitions, lower left and upper right, respectively, on the Archive’s home page. 

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BAND, Digital Humanities

A Watermark Mystery

Sometimes in archival work, you find yourself on these “side quests,” tracking down a paradoxically indispensable yet trivial bit of information. Such a quest came up after the last round of receipt proofing. A member of the Archive noticed that a handful of the receipts had watermarks with a range of visibility. Receipt number 26 had a particularly faint watermark that evaded straightforward identification. As this information—when present—is typically included in the publications, it was necessary to figure out if this watermark was visible enough to describe.

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BAND, Digital Humanities

Instagram as Archive: Blake and Digital Art Culture

Exciting news: the William Blake Archive now has an Instagram. This additional platform will enable Blake’s materials to reach new audiences through a primarily visual application, bringing decades of digital archival work into the pocket-sized cellular devices of over one billion active monthly users worldwide. Both known for ease of access and for interweaving the visual with the textual, Instagram and the William Blake Archive are a natural fit for one another.

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