Publication: JERUSALEM Copies A and I

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of Jerusalem The Emanation of The Giant...

That Every Child May Joy to Hear: A Musical Adaptation of "A Poison Tree"

The Blake Quarterly has published checklists and reviews of musical settings of Blake’s works in almost every genre. Today...

The Artist, the Poet, and the Proofreader

The relationship between vivid, poetic language and visual art has always intrigued me. As an undergrad, I majored in...

Publication: Pencil Sketches 1779-1790

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of forty-three pencil drawings produced by Blake...

"I heard a Devil curse": Blake and Halloween

It’s about time for Halloween for the Northern Division of the Blake Archive, and as the numerous Victorian houses...
Publications
Publication: JERUSALEM Copies A and I
Blake Quarterly
That Every Child May Joy to Hear: A Musical Adaptation of "A Poison Tree"
BAND
The Artist, the Poet, and the Proofreader
Publications
Publication: Pencil Sketches 1779-1790
BAND, Digital Humanities, Holiday
"I heard a Devil curse": Blake and Halloween
BAND

The History of Hell

Hell’s Printing Press, the blog of The Blake Archive and Blake Quarterly, is more than a decade old at this point, so it isn’t surprising that the hyperlinks found in the oldest entries don’t always work. To make the blog as user-friendly as possible I decided that it would make for a worthwhile winter break project to go through the old entries and fix or update as many broken links as can feasibly be fixed or updated.

Like any good editor, I’ve been conscientious about what kind of changes I’ve made and followed a strict policy of “when in doubt, don’t touch it!” Out of respect for authorial integrity, I don’t want any posts to link to anything categorically different from what the original authors intended to link to, even if it might seem to me to fulfill a similar purpose.

To put it another way, I don’t want to do anything that might make it look like someone from the future came in and meddled with the old posts. However, I do feel strongly that if you’re reading an old post which contains links to sites and pages that are still extant, you ought to be able to link to the extant versions of those sites and pages even if the url has changed at some point in the last decade.

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BAND

Visual Poetics & Blake’s Afterlife: Florine Stettheimer

New York saloniste Florine Stettheimer (1871-1944) was born nearly fifty years after William Blake’s death. Yet this wealthy American woman produced a body of artworks that bear remarkable resemblances to Blake’s illustrations. The two share many qualities: both were equal parts poet and visual artist, both produced works with highly idiosyncratic pictorial styles, and both had reputations as unconventional individuals.

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BAND

The Artist, the Poet, and the Proofreader

The relationship between vivid, poetic language and visual art has always intrigued me. As an undergrad, I majored in studio art and English, and naturally see the two creative disciplines as more alike than they are different. Coming from this interdisciplinary perspective, I’m fascinated with Blake’s unique body of work but was surprised to find that, until the late 20th century, research on Blake was generally divided between art history and literary studies (“Plan of the Archive”).

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BAND, XML

A Few (Small) Hiccups with the Receipts

It’s been a while since the last update on the “Receipts Project,” and so I thought I’d share a quick summary of what we’re up to with these strange scraps of paper, which throw up the most unexpected of challenges despite their modest size. As the receipts are scheduled for publication early next year, we’re currently at the stage of proofing and revision, and trying to deal with the following issues:

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What I learned from Blake’s account of the Scofield Incident

Transcribing and proofing literary work for digital publication can be a lot like translating. You get to know the content far better than you would from even an extremely slow and careful reading, because you’ve seen every sentence so many times. This was the experience I had several years ago when learning to translate Dostoevsky’s Хозяйка (The Landlady) for my language exam, and it was the experience I had this spring and summer while proofing a new batch of Blake letters for eventual publication. Throughout this process, William Blake’s August 16th 1803 letter to Thomas Butts became a particular favorite of mine (Find the complete text here: http://erdman.blakearchive.org/#b15).

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