Guest post: Portrait of a poet with a book

Today we have a guest post from Jonathan Morse of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. Jon sent us a...

Teaching First-Year Composition with the William Blake Archive

I am happy to report that I have finished my last spellcheck list, and will be switching tasks to...

Publication: TIRIEL Manuscript & Designs

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of the manuscript and the designs for Blake’s Tiriel. The Manuscript. Tiriel (c....

Reading around Jerusalem

The archive has just published Jerusalem (F), printed in 1827 and now owned by the Morgan Library and Museum. Copy...

Publication: JERUSALEM Copy F

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Jerusalem The Emanation of The...
Blake Quarterly
Guest post: Portrait of a poet with a book
BATS
Teaching First-Year Composition with the William Blake Archive
Publications
Publication: TIRIEL Manuscript & Designs
Blake Quarterly, Publications
Reading around Jerusalem
Publications
Publication: JERUSALEM Copy F
Blake Quarterly

Guest post: Portrait of a poet with a book

Today we have a guest post from Jonathan Morse of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. Jon sent us a message asking if we had a use for an image he’d found in the collections of the Library of Congress; his post is the result of that correspondence.

Between January and May 1920, William Butler Yeats toured the United States and Canada under the management of the J. B. Pond Lycaeum Lecture Bureau, addressing audiences on such topics as “The Irish Movement and the Irish Theatre” and “The Younger Generation.” By “the younger generation” he meant contemporary poets. So far as I have been able to learn from the newspaper coverage online at newspapers.com, in the Library of Congress, and in the archives of the student newspapers that covered his appearances at Oberlin and Yale, he never mentioned Blake.

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BATS

Teaching First-Year Composition with the William Blake Archive

I am happy to report that I have finished my last spellcheck list, and will be switching tasks to assist with image mark-up. Not an unwelcome “vicissitude,”

in the sense of the “Grateful vicissitude” of the perfectly-balanced changes from light to darkness that Milton describes in Paradise Lost. But I will miss the curiosities that I came across while checking Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly for spelling errors.

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BAND, XML

What I Learned from Researching Choice Tags

One of BAND’s long term projects is what we’re calling the <choice> Tag Project. The ultimate idea behind this project is to standardize our use of <choice> tags in textual transcriptions. Since there have been several blog posts written on this topic in the past, I thought a good way to begin would be to read those three posts and then to look through recently transcribed BADs in order to get a thorough exposure to all the different ways in which people are using <choice> tags.

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Publications

Publication: TIRIEL Manuscript & Designs

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of the manuscript and the designs for Blake’s Tiriel.

The ManuscriptTiriel (c. 1789) comprises a manuscript of fifteen pages of eight numbered sections plus three sketches and twelve known finished drawings (three untraced since 1863). Most of the drawings are more or less clearly related to passages in the manuscript. Originally, Blake may have planned to engrave the writing and the illustrations or a selection of them and assemble the two in a set sequence—with or without a publisher. Alternatively, he may have envisioned a typographic work with engraved illustrations. But he never saw the project through to completion, and the materials are now dispersed.

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Publications

Publication: JERUSALEM Copy F

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Jerusalem The Emanation of The Giant Albion Copy F, from the Morgan Library and Museum. Jerusalem is Blake’s masterpiece in illuminated printing, consisting of 100 relief and white-line etchings divided into four chapters. It is his longest illuminated book and its plates are among his largest, at approximately 22.5 x 16 cm. Though dated 1804 on its title plate, it was not printed in its entirety until c. 1820. Sixty plates may have been completed by 1807; a few examples were exhibited in 1812. The printing of 1820 produced Copies A, C, and D. In the next year, Blake printed Copies B (chapter 1 only, Plates 1-25) and E. Blake printed Copy F in 1827. Copies H-J are posthumous. Most lifetime copies have hand tinting in gray or black, but only Copies B and E are colored. There are two arrangements of the plates in chapter 2, early (Copies A and C) and late (Copies D and E).

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Blake Quarterly

A Last Hurrah

Our last hurrahs are like singers’ farewell tours—they tend to come around again next year—but this is a farewell to our fiftieth volume, which officially ends on 30 June, even though we have already published all four issues.

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Publications

Blake Quarterly 1970s Added to the Archive

In 2014 the Blake Archive added a new wing devoted to searchable HTML and PDF editions of back issues of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly. Today’s publication—all 40 issues from the 1970s—is the final big installment of the Archive’s ongoing project of making freely available, and fully searchable, over four decades of the journal, thus making public some of the most important scholarly work done in Blake studies over the past half century.

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BAND

Four Zoas: Glimpsing the Summit

I suppose the mountain-climbing analogy makes sense — climbing mountains is hard. For anyone with even a fleeting familiarity with this particular Blake manuscript, the difficulty of the Four Zoas is readily apparent. Reading it is hard. Editing it is, perhaps, futile. But we try. And even in our failures do we learn.

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