Q&A with Chris Hobson: Baldwin and Blake

Chris Hobson wrote the main article, “Blake, Paul, and Sexual Antinomianism,” in the winter 2018–19 issue of Blake. In...

Publication: Receipts 1805-1829

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of Blake’s receipts.

Guest post/poet: S. Yarberry interviews Aditi Machado

This post is by S. Yarberry, who approached us with the idea of interviewing poets about Blake and his...

Review: G. E. Bentley, Jr., Boondoggles: Travels of a Restless Professor

This review will appear in the summer 2019 issue of Blake.

New Feature: Archive Exhibitions

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the opening of a new wing of the Archive: a digital...
Q&A
Q&A with Chris Hobson: Baldwin and Blake
Publications
Publication: Receipts 1805-1829
Q&A
Guest post/poet: S. Yarberry interviews Aditi Machado
Blake Quarterly
Review: G. E. Bentley, Jr., Boondoggles: Travels of a Restless Professor
Publications
New Feature: Archive Exhibitions
Q&A

Q&A with Chris Hobson: Baldwin and Blake

Chris Hobson wrote the main article, “Blake, Paul, and Sexual Antinomianism,” in the winter 2018–19 issue of Blake. In the course of our correspondence he told me that he’d just published James Baldwin and the Heavenly City: Prophecy, Apocalypse, and Doubt, and that he sees Baldwin and Blake “as very similar figures despite the obvious differences in century, nationality, race. They share ideas of social change adapted from Revelation (for each, the central Bible text), as well as on sexuality and a rejection of false holiness.” Thus the germ of this Q&A was planted; many thanks to Chris for taking part.

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BATS

“The invisible worm” of Jerusalem MPI

In case you missed it, the William Blake Archive published Copies A and I of Jerusalem back in December. Alongside these two full copies of the poem, the Archive also published a collection of miscellaneous plates and impressions–or MPI–of Jerusalem. Among the miscellaneous plates are proof impressions, which are particularly helpful in revealing Blake’s creative and revisionary processes that led to the final published version of a Jerusalem text and/or image.

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Q&A

Guest post/poet: S. Yarberry interviews Aditi Machado

This post is by S. Yarberry, who approached us with the idea of interviewing poets about Blake and his infuence on their work: “I’m interested in bridging contemporary poetry with the academic study of Blake—academia and creative circles sometimes sit so far apart that we forget how much common language we have.” It has been lightly edited for style. Bios. are at the end of the post.

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Publications

New Feature: Archive Exhibitions

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the opening of a new wing of the Archive: a digital exhibition space that allows for curated presentations of selected works and/or special topics dealing with Blake’s oeuvre. Archive Exhibitions can be accessed through the drop-down at the upper right of the Archive’s home page. 

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Q&A

Q&A with Helen Bruder

This edition of our question and answer series is with Helen Bruder. The most recent of her editing collaborations with Tristanne Connolly, Beastly Blake, came out last year. Helen’s answers below are lightly edited.

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BAND

The History of Hell

Hell’s Printing Press, the blog of The Blake Archive and Blake Quarterly, is more than a decade old at this point, so it isn’t surprising that the hyperlinks found in the oldest entries don’t always work. To make the blog as user-friendly as possible I decided that it would make for a worthwhile winter break project to go through the old entries and fix or update as many broken links as can feasibly be fixed or updated.

Like any good editor, I’ve been conscientious about what kind of changes I’ve made and followed a strict policy of “when in doubt, don’t touch it!” Out of respect for authorial integrity, I don’t want any posts to link to anything categorically different from what the original authors intended to link to, even if it might seem to me to fulfill a similar purpose.

To put it another way, I don’t want to do anything that might make it look like someone from the future came in and meddled with the old posts. However, I do feel strongly that if you’re reading an old post which contains links to sites and pages that are still extant, you ought to be able to link to the extant versions of those sites and pages even if the url has changed at some point in the last decade.

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