Publication: URIZEN Copy J

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Blake’s The First Book...

Publication: A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of A Descriptive Catalogue of Pictures, Poetical and Historical Inventions, Painted...

Tutorial Video: Introduction to Search

Did you know that the search function of the William Blake Archive is one of the most helpful features...

Blake Quarterly spring issue

Our spring issue, with another bumper crop of contributions, is out this week and, even better, open access for...

Publication: VISIONS Copy R; Misc. Plates & Impressions

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Blake’s Visions of the Daughters...
Publications
Publication: URIZEN Copy J
Publications
Publication: A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE
BAND, Tutorial Videos
Tutorial Video: Introduction to Search
Blake Quarterly
Blake Quarterly spring issue
Publications
Publication: VISIONS Copy R; Misc. Plates & Impressions
Publications

Publication: URIZEN Copy J

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Blake’s The First Book of Urizen Copy J. This copy was acquired at an unknown time, probably in the nineteenth century, by the Royal Library, Vienna, and transferred in 1903 to the Albertina Museum, Vienna. However, it was not known to students of Blake until near the end of the twentieth century when the German Blake scholar and art historian Detlef Dörrbecker rediscovered it. This is the first time Copy J has been edited and reproduced in true-size, high-resolution images.

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BAND, Digital Humanities

From William Seward to William Blake—and Back Again: Lessons Learned from the William Blake Archive

As part of my duties as an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Digital Humanities, I am required to serve as a Research Assistant for one of the many digital humanities projects at the University of Rochester. I was drawn to the William Blake Archive for several reasons. First, the Archive is a foundational DH project. Its depth and multi-institutional workflow serve as a model for onlookers hoping to recreate a successful digital collaboration. Selfishly though, I was also drawn to the William Blake Archive with an intent to gain more experience in XML, TEI, and digital-documentary editing. I hoped to adapt elements of the William Blake Archive for a more recent digital project ongoing at the University of Rochester, the Seward Family Digital Archive.

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Publications

Publication: A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of Descriptive Catalogue of Pictures, Poetical and Historical Inventions, Painted by William Blake, in Water Colours, Being the Ancient Method of Fresco Painting Restored: and [water color] Drawings, For Public Inspection, and for Sale by Private Contract. Printed by a job printer in a small run, perhaps fewer than one hundred copies, the catalogue accompanied his self-organized one-man exhibition of 1809-10. It hung in the rooms above his brother’s haberdashery shop in Soho—Blake’s childhood home. The price of the catalogue included admission to the exhibition.

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BAND, Tutorial Videos

Tutorial Video: Introduction to Search

Did you know that the search function of the William Blake Archive is one of the most helpful features of the site, allowing you to search both text and image content?

With our search function, you can plug in search terms that lead you not only to poetry and prose, but to images that illustrate the ideas or content that interest you.

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BAND

Reimagining William Blake in the Great War

2018 marks the 100 year anniversary of the ending of WWI, (that is if you do not factor in the Treaty of Versailles in 1919) and just so happens to coincide with a graduate seminar I am currently enrolled in called  “The Great War and Modern Memory.” This class has curiously overlapped in subtle ways with my time spent pondering Blake in the Archive. Blake, of course, did not fight in WWI, but in a strange mixture of past and present, similar to this blog post, he inspired many of the WWI poets and even artists who lived through the Great War and who drew upon his poetry and art in inspiring their own.  

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BAND

Teaching with the Archive

One of the more significant items on my busy schedule this semester is teaching Introduction to Digital Media Studies here at UR. It’s a class I very much enjoy teaching, and one for which I also very much enjoyed designing the syllabus.

Intended as a survey of all things DMS, the class cruises through a wide variety of ideas, tech, people, and histories. Given my close association with the Blake Archive for the last 4.5 years (really?!), I couldn’t help but sneak some BA in there. 

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BAND, XML

A New Guide to Choice Tags

Last time I blogged about the <choice> Tag Project, I established a semi-comprehensive list of situations that required <choice> tags, and ended with a series of unsettled questions. Since then I have investigated the issue more thoroughly and now, having answered those questions, I can put together a more definitive guide. 

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BAND

Reconciling the Four Zoas and Marginalia Encoding Schemas

A while back (actually it’s been more than a year) I wrote about our efforts to develop a set of shared terms to be used across the Four Zoas and Marginalia projects. We’ve been struggling with this since, with the use of <layer> in the marginalia encoding as an interim solution. Since the Four Zoas project has unusual (ahem) layout and intensive revisions, we introduced <zone> to represent the spatial structure of the text and <stage> as a child element of line in an attempt to represent every act of editing in detail. For the marginalia however, we needed a tag to distinguish between Blake’s writing and the typographic text more than anything to denote layers of revision and editing within the line. In order to avoid confusion, we decided to use <layer> for our schema. The results looked like this:

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Publications

Publication: VISIONS Copy R; Misc. Plates & Impressions

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Blake’s Visions of the Daughters of Albion Copy R from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Munich; colored impressions of Visions Plates 1, 2, and 3 (Copy mpi) from the Morgan Library and Museum; a proof of Visions Plate 6 from the Fitzwilliam Museum that belongs to our previously published Visions Copy a; and five monochrome wash drawings for the wood engravings in Thornton’s Virgil added to the seven previously published designs.

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