Reading around Jerusalem

The archive has just published Jerusalem (F), printed in 1827 and now owned by the Morgan Library and Museum. Copy...

Publication: JERUSALEM Copy F

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Jerusalem The Emanation of The...

An Anniversary Letter to Blake Books

There are many Blake books but only one Blake Books by G. E. Bentley, Jr., the catalogue of works and criticism...

Blake Quarterly 1970s Added to the Archive

In 2014 the Blake Archive added a new wing devoted to searchable HTML and PDF editions of back issues...

Four Zoas: Glimpsing the Summit

I suppose the mountain-climbing analogy makes sense — climbing mountains is hard. For anyone with even a fleeting familiarity...
Blake Quarterly, Publications
Reading around Jerusalem
Publications
Publication: JERUSALEM Copy F
Blake Quarterly
An Anniversary Letter to Blake Books
Publications
Blake Quarterly 1970s Added to the Archive
BAND
Four Zoas: Glimpsing the Summit
Publications

Publication: JERUSALEM Copy F

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Jerusalem The Emanation of The Giant Albion Copy F, from the Morgan Library and Museum. Jerusalem is Blake’s masterpiece in illuminated printing, consisting of 100 relief and white-line etchings divided into four chapters. It is his longest illuminated book and its plates are among his largest, at approximately 22.5 x 16 cm. Though dated 1804 on its title plate, it was not printed in its entirety until c. 1820. Sixty plates may have been completed by 1807; a few examples were exhibited in 1812. The printing of 1820 produced Copies A, C, and D. In the next year, Blake printed Copies B (chapter 1 only, Plates 1-25) and E. Blake printed Copy F in 1827. Copies H-J are posthumous. Most lifetime copies have hand tinting in gray or black, but only Copies B and E are colored. There are two arrangements of the plates in chapter 2, early (Copies A and C) and late (Copies D and E).

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Blake Quarterly

A Last Hurrah

Our last hurrahs are like singers’ farewell tours—they tend to come around again next year—but this is a farewell to our fiftieth volume, which officially ends on 30 June, even though we have already published all four issues.

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Publications

Blake Quarterly 1970s Added to the Archive

In 2014 the Blake Archive added a new wing devoted to searchable HTML and PDF editions of back issues of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly. Today’s publication—all 40 issues from the 1970s—is the final big installment of the Archive’s ongoing project of making freely available, and fully searchable, over four decades of the journal, thus making public some of the most important scholarly work done in Blake studies over the past half century.

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BAND

Four Zoas: Glimpsing the Summit

I suppose the mountain-climbing analogy makes sense — climbing mountains is hard. For anyone with even a fleeting familiarity with this particular Blake manuscript, the difficulty of the Four Zoas is readily apparent. Reading it is hard. Editing it is, perhaps, futile. But we try. And even in our failures do we learn.

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Blake Quarterly

The Fortunate “Un-“fortunate in BIQ Wordlists

While still working through the S-Z wordlist of potential misspellings in Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly, I have found myself amidst a list of “Un-” vocabulary. Almost exactly a year ago, I reflected on the isolation of “self” and its implications as I remediated words that required a hyphen, separating “self” from terms like “alienation,” “complicating,” “defeating,” and “deluding” by adding a hyphen that the OCR had mistakenly removed. And now that I’ve reached the end of my list, I reflect again on what this work teaches me about William Blake scholarship, and about language more generally.

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BAND

BAND: A Healthy Difference in Academic Work

This week was my first week back in The William Blake Archive offices in over a month having taken a hiatus from work in order to study and take my PhD qualifying exams. This was the longest break I have had away from the archive since starting graduate school, and the first day back in the office helped me appreciate the healthy difference between my archive work and my research work.

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