Reading around Jerusalem

The archive has just published Jerusalem (F), printed in 1827 and now owned by the Morgan Library and Museum. Copy...

Publication: JERUSALEM Copy F

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Jerusalem The Emanation of The...

An Anniversary Letter to Blake Books

There are many Blake books but only one Blake Books by G. E. Bentley, Jr., the catalogue of works and criticism...

Blake Quarterly 1970s Added to the Archive

In 2014 the Blake Archive added a new wing devoted to searchable HTML and PDF editions of back issues...

Four Zoas: Glimpsing the Summit

I suppose the mountain-climbing analogy makes sense — climbing mountains is hard. For anyone with even a fleeting familiarity...
Blake Quarterly, Publications
Reading around Jerusalem
Publications
Publication: JERUSALEM Copy F
Blake Quarterly
An Anniversary Letter to Blake Books
Publications
Blake Quarterly 1970s Added to the Archive
BAND
Four Zoas: Glimpsing the Summit
BATS

The Oxford Comma and the Rogue Apostrophe: Editorial Principles and Punctuation in the Blake Archive

The Oxford comma is having its moment in the spotlight in recent news, after it was used to clinch a legal case in favor of the five drivers in O’Connor v. Oakhurst Dairy who, according to the interpretation of policy in the absence of the comma, were therefore found to be eligible for overtime pay. And grammar geeks on the side of the Oxford comma have been rejoicing.

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BATS

Blake’s Aniconic Arboreals

“What if God was one of us?” asks singer-songwriter Joan Osborne. It’s actually not that hard to imagine God as a person. Many are familiar with the image of God as the deity appears in Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam: an old, imperious man with flowing hair and beard. For many raised in Judeo-Christian traditions, the portrayal of Alanis Morissette as God in the movie Dogma is as far from that image as the imagination strays. Beyond this narrow anthropomorphism, however, lie countless aniconic representations of divinity.

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BAND

Where’s the Marginalia?

My colleagues have been updating this blog fairly regularly with details of our progress with the marginalia — there’s nothing really much to add there. But with (hopefully) most of the encoding work behind us, there’s still quite a few hurdles ahead, e.g. display. With the Archive being such a collaborative, multi-university effort, we don’t have that much control over the final display of objects, or actually, much knowledge of how this is going to come about.

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BAND, XML

William Blake’s letters: Date dilemma and Keynes’s commas

Bentley reads William Blake’s letter to Thomas Butts dated September, 23, 1800 as “22 September 1800” and makes a footnote explaining the same (1541). Similarly, another letter written to Butts dated January 10, 1802 is a matter of dispute and disagreement among scholars and editors. While the object (image— lt10jan1802.1.2.LT.300.jpg) itself says “January 10. 1802”, Erdman suggests it is 1803 and not 1802, and Keynes mentions both. When we were discussing this in our BAND meeting, Sarah recommended me a copy of “Blake/ An Illustrated Quarterly 51 Volume 13 Number 3 Winter 79-80”; I did find a brief note about this discrepancy in this issue (page 148). Then the concern was how and where should we address this in the XML file.

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Publications

Four Copies of The Book of Thel Added to Archive

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of The Book of Thel copy C from the Morgan Library and Museum, copies E and K from Yale’s Beinecke Library, and copy M from the New York Public Library. They are accompanied by proofs of five of Thel’s eight plates (2-5 and 7) that form copy a in the Morgan Library. These copies and proofs join copies B, D, F, G, H, I, J, L, N, O, and R. The Archive has now published all extant copies of this illuminated book except copy A in a private collection.
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BAND, XML

Trouble in paradise: our divergent uses of the new marginalia schema

In the excitingly titled “So then what happened?” Rob outlined some of the major changes that we’ve introduced to the marginalia schema, such as using specific <layer>s to differentiate between typographic text and Blake’s writing, dispensing with line numbers for the typographic text, and dividing the annotations into discrete zones with fluid spatial coordinates. Armed with these new and fascinating solutions, we decided to transcribe the marginalia BADs independently and to hold bimonthly update sessions to discuss our progress or talk about any specific problems that came up.

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Blake Quarterly

Book review: Paul Peucker, A Time of Sifting: Mystical Marriage and the Crisis of Moravian Piety in the Eighteenth Century

This review will appear in the spring 2017 issue of Blake. The reviewer is Marsha Keith Schuchard, the author of many articles and books on Blake and his circle. To the journal she has contributed “Blake’s Healing Trio: Magnetism, Medicine, and Mania,” “The Secret Masonic History of Blake’s Swedenborg Society,” and “Young William Blake and the Moravian Tradition of Visionary Art,” as well as an article with Keri Davies, “Recovering the Lost Moravian History of William Blake’s Family,” which is referenced below.

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Uncategorized

So then what happened?

Seven months ago I wrote a blog titled “Some Promising Forays into Transcribing Blake’s Marginalia.” Much has changed!

After months of grappling with the logistical and philosophical challenges involved in marginalia transcription, we now have what we think will be the actual marginalia tag-set moving forward (though to be sure, there are a few questions we’re saving for Blake Camp). 

As a follow up to the “Promising Forays” I want to provide a brief quasi-narrative description of how we got from point A to point B. 

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