Tutorial Video: Finding and Using Digital Erdman

Did you know that the Blake Archive contains an entire digital edition of David Erdman’s The Complete Poetry and Prose...

"Rosenbach and Blake" (and Bentley)

This week we published our winter issue (vol. 51, no. 3), which will be completely open access for the...

Publication: VALA, or THE FOUR ZOAS

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of a digital edition of Blake’s VALA, or The...

Q&A: Exhibition at Petworth House

Our latest Q&A is with Andrew Loukes, curator of collections and exhibitions at Petworth House, about their upcoming Blake exhibition...

Hacking [away at] FOUR ZOAS

As ever and as always, work continues on the Four Zoas. 
Tutorial Videos
Tutorial Video: Finding and Using Digital Erdman
Blake Quarterly
"Rosenbach and Blake" (and Bentley)
Publications
Publication: VALA, or THE FOUR ZOAS
Blake Quarterly
Q&A: Exhibition at Petworth House
BAND
Hacking [away at] FOUR ZOAS
BAND, XML

The Much-Anticipated Receipts Update

The previous occasion upon which we brought to your attention the documentation of Blake’s inimitable and exciting fiscal accounts was in mid-2016, so it’s about time we revisited the manifold problems plaguing the receipts project. The project has been gathering (only a little) dust while we paid attention to more pressing questions raised by the redesign, the Four Zoas display, the marginalia schema, not to mention the terrifying experience of recording tutorial videos! But, finally, the (all new) Receipts Team – comprising the brand new BAND member Emily Tronson, the not-so-new Alex Zawacki and myself – has reconvened and we’ve been trying to compile a list of objectives to guide our attempts to prepare a single, complete BAD with all the receipts in our possession. Here are some (hopefully) interesting thoughts and considerations we’ve come up with:

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BAND

Blake’s Divisive “Lord’s Prayer” Marginalia

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been working piecemeal on encoding Blake’s marginalia for Robert Thornton’s The Lord’s Prayer, Newly Translated (1827), a 10-page pamphlet which gives a new translation of the Lord’s Prayer from the original version in Matthew 6:9-13 and accompanying critical and explanatory notes. Unlike with most of the Blake marginalia pages, which have relatively legible writing —

— deciphering this one was a challenge, and not quite achieved (though I’m hardly alone in failing to do this). The difficulty was largely owing to two features which are not typical of the Blake marginalia in other pages of the Thornton, or in the Watson and Lavater books we’re also working on: it seems to be written in something like smudgy grey pencil, and, at first sight, it seems to consist of one large nebulous mass extending up the right side from the bottom margin. Blake did certainly write his marginal notes all over the margins of his books and sometimes at odd angles to the text on the page:

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Blake Quarterly

Paul Miner

Recently we discovered that Paul Miner, an independent Blake scholar whose work is well known to many of the readers of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly, passed away earlier this year. Morton Paley noticed that items from Paul’s collection were being offered by a bookseller online, describing him as “late,” and some phone calls confirmed the sad news.

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Publications

Archive Update: Virtual Lightbox

The William Blake Archive is pleased to launch the virtual Lightbox, a major addition to the Archive’s array of digital tools. It replaces an earlier version discontinued in 2013 because of security issues. This entirely new Lightbox has been specially developed for the Archive by Tae Lerch of UNC’s Office of Arts & Sciences Information Services and Michael Fox, the Archive’s assistant editor, who has also implemented many new features in our Reading View and significant improvements to the Archive’s server and to its back end and interface. Together, these new tools and enhancements amount to a relaunching of the Blake Archive.

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Uncategorized

Imaging Ecstasy: Tagging Emotions in Illustration Markup

My contributions to Hell’s Printing Press typically investigate aspects of my own job at the WBA—illustration markup—and focus on the process of textual tagging (see my earlier post about textual tagging broadly as well as studies of the tags “streams of gore” and “lunging”). Assigning tags from our list of terms is both an illuminating and challenging process as Blake continually experimented with new iconography, forms, and materials. Tagging specific figures from literature, religion, and Blakean mythology often involves research to identify characters such as Lamech, Libicoco, and the “nameless shadowy female.” However, some of the most difficult tags to assign, I have found, are those associated with mental states and emotions.

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Blake Quarterly

Guest post: Portrait of a poet with a book

Today we have a guest post from Jonathan Morse of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. Jon sent us a message asking if we had a use for an image he’d found in the collections of the Library of Congress; his post is the result of that correspondence.

Between January and May 1920, William Butler Yeats toured the United States and Canada under the management of the J. B. Pond Lycaeum Lecture Bureau, addressing audiences on such topics as “The Irish Movement and the Irish Theatre” and “The Younger Generation.” By “the younger generation” he meant contemporary poets. So far as I have been able to learn from the newspaper coverage online at newspapers.com, in the Library of Congress, and in the archives of the student newspapers that covered his appearances at Oberlin and Yale, he never mentioned Blake.

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BATS

Teaching First-Year Composition with the William Blake Archive

I am happy to report that I have finished my last spellcheck list, and will be switching tasks to assist with image mark-up. Not an unwelcome “vicissitude,”

in the sense of the “Grateful vicissitude” of the perfectly-balanced changes from light to darkness that Milton describes in Paradise Lost. But I will miss the curiosities that I came across while checking Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly for spelling errors.

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