A new issue of the Blake Quarterly

This morning we published our autumn issue, which will be open access for the next week or so. Publication...

Guest post: Portrait of a poet with a book

Today we have a guest post from Jonathan Morse of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. Jon sent us a...

Teaching First-Year Composition with the William Blake Archive

I am happy to report that I have finished my last spellcheck list, and will be switching tasks to...

Publication: TIRIEL Manuscript & Designs

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of digital editions of the manuscript and the designs for Blake’s Tiriel. The Manuscript. Tiriel (c....

Reading around Jerusalem

The archive has just published Jerusalem (F), printed in 1827 and now owned by the Morgan Library and Museum. Copy...
Blake Quarterly
A new issue of the Blake Quarterly
Blake Quarterly
Guest post: Portrait of a poet with a book
BATS
Teaching First-Year Composition with the William Blake Archive
Publications
Publication: TIRIEL Manuscript & Designs
Blake Quarterly, Publications
Reading around Jerusalem
BAND

Four Zoas: Glimpsing the Summit

I suppose the mountain-climbing analogy makes sense — climbing mountains is hard. For anyone with even a fleeting familiarity with this particular Blake manuscript, the difficulty of the Four Zoas is readily apparent. Reading it is hard. Editing it is, perhaps, futile. But we try. And even in our failures do we learn.

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Blake Quarterly

The Fortunate “Un-“fortunate in BIQ Wordlists

While still working through the S-Z wordlist of potential misspellings in Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly, I have found myself amidst a list of “Un-” vocabulary. Almost exactly a year ago, I reflected on the isolation of “self” and its implications as I remediated words that required a hyphen, separating “self” from terms like “alienation,” “complicating,” “defeating,” and “deluding” by adding a hyphen that the OCR had mistakenly removed. And now that I’ve reached the end of my list, I reflect again on what this work teaches me about William Blake scholarship, and about language more generally.

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BAND

BAND: A Healthy Difference in Academic Work

This week was my first week back in The William Blake Archive offices in over a month having taken a hiatus from work in order to study and take my PhD qualifying exams. This was the longest break I have had away from the archive since starting graduate school, and the first day back in the office helped me appreciate the healthy difference between my archive work and my research work.

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BATS

The Oxford Comma and the Rogue Apostrophe: Editorial Principles and Punctuation in the Blake Archive

The Oxford comma is having its moment in the spotlight in recent news, after it was used to clinch a legal case in favor of the five drivers in O’Connor v. Oakhurst Dairy who, according to the interpretation of policy in the absence of the comma, were therefore found to be eligible for overtime pay. And grammar geeks on the side of the Oxford comma have been rejoicing.

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BATS

Blake’s Aniconic Arboreals

“What if God was one of us?” asks singer-songwriter Joan Osborne. It’s actually not that hard to imagine God as a person. Many are familiar with the image of God as the deity appears in Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam: an old, imperious man with flowing hair and beard. For many raised in Judeo-Christian traditions, the portrayal of Alanis Morissette as God in the movie Dogma is as far from that image as the imagination strays. Beyond this narrow anthropomorphism, however, lie countless aniconic representations of divinity.

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BAND

Where’s the Marginalia?

My colleagues have been updating this blog fairly regularly with details of our progress with the marginalia — there’s nothing really much to add there. But with (hopefully) most of the encoding work behind us, there’s still quite a few hurdles ahead, e.g. display. With the Archive being such a collaborative, multi-university effort, we don’t have that much control over the final display of objects, or actually, much knowledge of how this is going to come about.

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